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ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER

 


  • Kato Lefkara, the village famous for its “Lafkaritika” embroideries, is a community rich in tradition and archaic past, which goes as far back as the Hellenistic and Roman years according to the findings in ancient tombs that have been discovered in the area. Today, the community continues to preserve the ethos and character of an authentic and vivid Cypriot heritage, popular tradition and dream.
  • The few residents do not use donkeys or mules anymore, nor do they use the plough for the dry olive cultivations, which, along with carob cultivations, were known in the medieval years as the gold of Cyprus. However, the women of the village, being very skilled at needlepoint, continue to use the same technique, the same patterns and to turn plain linen textiles into highly sought-after embroideries to be used as dowry for their daughters or granddaughters and later on for Duchesses and Kings. In fact, it was here where the art of the silversmith developed along with that of the embroideries. Today, a wide variety of “lefkaritika” embroideries known for the wealth and variety of patterns, as well as their uniqueness as an important art form, are produced in the village. It is a real form of folk wealth which UNESCO has classified amongst world cultural heritage.
  • Two important byzantine monuments adorn the Community; the first is the Church of Archangel Michael, which was built in the 12th century and is adorned by wonderful frescos and was also the Metropolis of Kiti and Amathounta during the Venetian occupation in 1259. The second, is the church of Agios Timotheos, a unique church in Cyprus whose frescos have not unfortunately been preserved through time. However, it is also a single-roomed cross church with a dome, of also great cultural value.  
  • Preserved in the village are some distinctive idyllic areas which remind visitors of Cyprus in the past. One such area is the “Tziourin”, a source of water for all the animals of the village and the water burrows. Also distinctive is a neighbourhood in the village known by the nickname “oi koftoudes”. It is a small square in the centre of the village where, in the past, the community authorities would gather around a torch standing on a capsized basket and make decisions regarding the village and the taxes that were to be imposed based on their own preferences, without actually asking for anybody’s opinion.